Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Pancakes for a Purpose with the Tri Delta Sorority


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by Carly Caporrino &Jackson Boisvert

This last Sunday, the Delta Delta Delta sorority of Stockton University hosted their annual TriHop Pancake Breakfast. This event was held on campus at the Lakeside Lodge. The event was open for anyone to attend and was a great time to spend with family, friends, and fellow Stockton students.
Demi DeAngelis, a sister of Delta Delta Delta and their Philanthropy Chair, who organized the event, described the event in her own words: “TriHop is a fundraiser that Tri Delta hosts once a year! It’s basically a buffet-style pancake breakfast. Our sisters provide the food and they make it fresh while we’re there!”

All week prior to TriHop, the sisters of the sorority were tabling to spread the word about the event. From the money that was collected at tabling, to the money collected at the event, the event gathered a grand total of approximately $2,000. All of the proceeds go to Tri Delta’s national philanthropy, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.

The sorority also held a raffle for the chance to win different themed baskets filled with different items. There were also fun activities that also help the philanthropy with a ‘Pie a Delta’ in the face for $1!

DeAngelis then shared her thoughts on the event and why she personally enjoys it: “I really like this event because everyone’s families and friends come! We’re so passionate about fundraising for St. Jude, and I love that we get to show our family and friends how much it means to us and all of our accomplishments. It’s really nice spending the day with everyone, raising money for a great cause and eating lots of food!”
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New Fraternity on Campus: Welcome Phi Delta Theta




by Jackson Boisvert

Each spring semester, Greek life becomes a new experience for many Stockton students. Stockton’s fraternities and sororities make up 10% of the undergraduate community. Previously, 27 different organizations were recognized at Stockton. As of recently, there is a new fraternity found its way onto Stockton’s campus. They are Phi Delta Theta, recently recognized on March 30th, the same day as their colonization ceremony.

Jelani Gardy, a first-year student studying political science here at Stockton, holds the position of president for the newly colonized organization. He described how the idea of bringing a new fraternity to Stockton came to be. “ We saw that because the new freshmen class that came in was the largest, and Stockton is expanding to Atlantic City, as well as the two new buildings (on campus), we thought it would be a good idea to help out with that expansion, and create a new fraternity that offers something new and different than the ones that are already here.” When asked why Phi Delta Theta, Jelani informed, “We happened to choose Phi Delta Theta because of the qualities it has as a fraternity, such as non-alcoholic housing and a very nice philanthropy, which is the foundation Live Like Lou, which raises awareness for ALS and raises money for families affected by ALS and puts money towards research.”

However, the process of bringing this new organization was not just a task for Jelani himself. He accomplished this with his brothers. “We currently have 30 members,” he detailed, further stating, “A pretty unique thing about all of us is that we are all leaders. It takes a lot for a person to say, ‘I’m going to change the status quo, do something different, and make something from the ground up”. That is exactly what this group of men did.


Stockton’s Mu Sigma Upsilon Sorority Hosts Tea for Two


Written by: Jake Levitz

Tuesday, April 10th at 8pm, Stockton University's chapter of Mu Sigma Upsilon hosted its first ever tea party. This event was part of their community communication initiative in order to host a free event that the whole school could attend. They call it Tea for 2, an opportunity for students to connect and get to know a stranger and create new friends and bonds with their fellow students. The president of the chapter, Kelly Sounthavong, said the event was “something for the school and not just the sorority… a way for us to mingle and get to know everybody,” the sisters of Mu Sigma Upsilon wanted to create an more intimate opportunity for dialogue between them and their fellow students.

President Sounthavong was encouraging about the influence this event might have on other greek organizations, she hopes that it will create a platform for groups to get together and share a dialogue to possibly create more free events that are not just mandatory, so that people can get together and just simply talk. Being a smaller sorority, the sisters of Mu Sigma Upsilon wanted to engage with the Stockton community

Mu Sigma Upsilon encourages all students and members of the community to participate in their relationship building event. Tea for 2 is described by the sorority as “an opportunity to engage with students from all areas of the schools campus life,” describing it as, “speed dating but for friendship.” The sisters of the sorority always enjoy being able to participate within the community especially in the Stockton community which is an opportunity to build with their sisters as a whole in a team building experience. Being a smaller sorority creates an introverted environment so by participating in events such as this helps. President Sounthavong says, “Expand on greek unity together and expand on our other connections besides greek life.” By coming to the sorority, Southavong says, “ I just met this stranger, but I feel safe with them. I just spilled some of my secrets with them but I’m ok with that. I'm in a safe space right now to be myself.”

The sisters of Mu Sigma Upsilon hope to participate in more Stockton community based events in order to further engage relationship building development. Other events planned for the sorority include educational based events and many future philanthropic planned functions. The sisters hope to promote more free thinking functions in the future.



LGBT PROM SEQUEL


By Amanda Genovese
The Creator’s Collective Organization will be hosting their second annual LGBT Prom.  This event will take place on April 21st at 8 pm and will run until midnight. The prom location will be in the Campus Center Event Room A. There will be food, music, prizes, and a candybar. “This prom was successful last year and I enjoyed it. I am happy this organization decided to host a second Prom. I hope this event continues for many years.” Junior, Anthony Bastos said.  There should be a headcount of 100 students attending this year.


“This is an event that students can just enjoy themselves and eat, dance, and have a fun time without feeling judged.”  Bastos said. Entry will be free but the Creator’s Collective Organization will be accepting donations that will go towards the Trevor Project. Come out and have fun for a night with refreshments, music, and prizes!

Artful Souls on Stockton Walls


BY SHANNON JOYCE
Souls are displayed on the walls of Stockton University’s Art Gallery for the annual Bachelor of Fine Arts Senior Exhibition.
This includes artwork from 21 B.F.A. seniors concentrating in photography, painting, print-making, visual communications, and graphic design.
Note: Harley Jarrett identifies as non-binary; a term for those who do not classify themselves as exclusively masculine or feminine. This artist prefers they/them pronouns.
Painting Major Harley Jarrett passionately shared their love for art. “I feel like the thing that sets us apart from other animals is our urge to sing, tell stories, and make marks with stuff,” they said.
This senior is fascinated with abstract art and psychological landscapes, as seen in their piece, “Decaying Leaf.” Jarrett commented that similar concepts are often shared on Instagram. “It seems kind of magical to me,” they added. Jarrett’s woodsy property in South Jersey was the inspiration for their nature canvases.  
This senior “has an urge” to one day attend graduate school for painting. For now, Jarrett is interested in a painting, typography, or possibly graphic design career.
Photography Major Alex Blundetto created portraits of loved ones, titled “People Along the Way,” after realizing, “These people really mean a lot to me, and I want to use my project to show that.” He received most positive feedback for “Carmen,” a photograph of his father in a construction workspace.
After graduation, Blundetto wants to become a professional freelance photographer. He heartily said, “The dream, honestly, is to just be able to travel . . .”
Print-Making Major Christian Bostwick believes being bold is “better than being boring,” as shown with his installation piece titled, “Nonsensical Fallout.” He stated, “My work simplifies a lot of the problems in society without trying to marginalize them . . . I just try to bring out the absurdity in the inherent issues in the world.”
Christian explained print-making involves making duplicates of art such as painting or photography. Think illustrations and photographs found in school textbooks. “I would love to run my own print-making studio at some point in my life . . . the end goal would be to print my own artwork,” he excitedly said.

June 22-24, 2018, Christian will create artwork for Atlantic City’s 48 Blocks Festival. According to 48blocksac.com, this “is a celebration of the artistic talents, creativity, community, culture, and history of Atlantic City.”


Painting Major Vanessa Spollen said she learned a lot about herself while creating her project, called “Visions of a Life.” When asked what prompted her exhibition, she said, “Everybody in this life is connected within each other.” Spollen mentioned another inspiration was the work of Carl Jung, a twentieth-century famous psychologist. “I used painting to express him . . . his theories are all . . . interconnected . . . unconsciously.” Next, Spollen hopes to earn her M.F.A. in Painting.


New Fraternity on Campus: Welcome Phi Delta Theta



By: Jackson Boisvert
Each spring semester, Greek life becomes a new experience for many Stockton students. Stockton’s fraternities and sororities make up 10% of the undergraduate community. Previously, 27 different organizations were recognized at Stockton. As of recently, there is a new fraternity found its way onto Stockton’s campus. They are Phi Delta Theta, recently recognized on March 30th, the same day as their colonization ceremony.
Jelani Gardy, a first-year student studying political science here at Stockton, holds the position of president for the newly colonized organization. He described how the idea of bringing a new fraternity to Stockton came to be. “ We saw that because the new freshmen class that came in was the largest, and Stockton is expanding to Atlantic City, as well as the two new buildings (on campus), we thought it would be a good idea to help out with that expansion, and  create a new fraternity that offers something new and different than the ones that are already here.” When asked why Phi Delta Theta, Jelani informed, “We happened to choose Phi Delta Theta because of the qualities it has as a fraternity, such as non-alcoholic housing and a very nice philanthropy, which is the foundation Live Like Lou, which raises awareness for ALS and raises money for families affected by ALS and puts money towards research.”
However, the process of bringing this new organization was not just a task for Jelani himself. He accomplished this with his brothers. “We currently have 30 members,” he detailed, further stating, “A pretty unique thing about all of us is that we are all leaders. It takes a lot for a person to say, ‘I’m going to change the status quo, do something different, and make something from the ground up”. That is exactly what this group of men did.  


How Reliable and Impactful is Rate My Professors?


By Michael Donne

When it comes time to pick classes for the upcoming semester, many students will flock to Rate My Professors to get a first impression of who they may be learning from for the next few months. Rate My Professors allows students to rate their instructors on the level of difficulty and overall quality of the class on a scale of one to five. They are also given three tags to describe the teacher such as if they are a tough grader, whether or not they give extra credit, or their overall personality. While this can be a big help to students and a confidence booster for teachers, many reviews can be biased.
A student receiving a bad grade in the class could result in a negative review for the teacher, whether or not it was deserved. Unfortunately, many reviews of professors at Stockton is that the higher difficulty courses often correlates to a low quality rating. This trend is the most prevalent in general courses, as there is little to no chance for professors who are challenging in general courses to also receive a good rating. Freshmen Brandon Bess comments on why this is the case,  “How am I going to use any of this information? Individuals use rate my professor to select easier classes based on ratings, in hopes to get an easy A. It's so biased in my opinion, i've taken classes with professors who had low ratings and they were the complete opposite from their reviews.” With all of Rate My Professors pros and cons, the expectation for general courses is one of the more worrying things about the website. Rather than taking a interesting or possibly career changing class, students may miss these opportunities to instead take a class that poses no challenge to them.
To Professors, Rate My Professors is a website that many teachers look at seriously or avoid at all costs. Professor Erin O’Hanlon recently visited Rate My Professors for the first time, and was pleasantly surprised at the rating she received, with only being upset about one thing, her hotness,  “Personally, I’m shocked, because I think I should have more red peppers.” To many professors, the rating that really matters is the feedback students give on I.D.E.A forms. “They look at the I.D.E.A scores more closely because they are validated,” Professor O’Hanlon speaking about why she believes Rate My Professors doesn’t impact teachers like it can for students.
While Rate My Professors does have its drawback, it is not too powerful and many of the problems disappear when looking at higher level courses, when students begin to appreciate a difficult class that challenges them. For O’Hanlon, Rate My Professors is just one of the many variables students account for when picking classes, “If students rely so heavily on Rate My Professors that they make a choice based on that factor alone, they might be missing out on some great faculty and great courses. But I think that students make choices on their classes based on a lot of things, how does it fit into their schedule, will it impact their Thirsty Thursdays, have they had this professor before?”
While Rate My Professor can be a good resource, many reviews should be taken with a grain of salt, and students should instead make sure that they are learning and taking the classes that can allow them to leave Stockton with the best education possible.



Meet the South Jersey Film Nerds

By Luke Miller

At Stockton University there is a variety of clubs you can choose from, covering
all kinds of hobbies and interests. Each semester students are encouraged to put
themselves out there and find a club that works for them. But until the Spring 2018
Semester, Stockton lacked the presence of a film club. But as of this semester the
South Jersey Film Nerds are a new club, looking for anyone from any major to join!

Mike Gencarelli, a junior at Stockton and a communications major, said about the
club, “South Jersey Film Nerds is about collectiveness and bringing members together
to work on projects, as well as getting new people involved.” Mike spoke about how
through the club he has gained new friends with similar interests, all while gaining
valuable work experience.

They work on their own independent projects, work with each
other on projects, or film other club events. “I have done projects, fundraising, making
films, filming events, and planning the future of the club.”

Mike also took the initiative
and ran for the club’s Treasurer position, and won. Mike has truly taken advantage of
this new club, and new opportunities.

If you are interested in working on your own projects, working on projects with
other people, or filming events for clubs, then this club is for you. They meet twice a
week, on Wednesdays and Thursdays at the main campus.

Regardless of whether you
want to film your own movies or just help people with theirs, this club is a great
networking opportunity. This is a young club, and with time will only get better. The more
members they get, the more the club will grow. Before they came along, Stockton was

missing a film club, but now that the South Jersey Film Nerds are here take advantage
of it.

Relay For Life At Stockton


By Stephanie Russell
Stockton had their 6th annual Relay For Life on Friday, April 13th which lasted for twelve hours from 6:30pm until 6:30am on Saturday. As students gathered their teams to start the event, everyone had come to learn this year’s Relay For Life at Stockton University raised an estimated $30,000.

Relay For Life is a community based fundraising event, it lasts twelve to twenty-four hours. Stockton’s twelve hour Relay For Life was full of fun activities for those who were participating, like Zumba, musical chairs, improv plays, and yoga! It started off with a walk for just the survivors of cancer, then their caretakers joined them in walking, and after those two laps everyone joined in walking the track. Laps were sponsored by organizations like Zeta Tau Alpha, Stockton SET, Panhellenic Council and more. There were things handed out by each organization to those of whom were walking the track.

The man who was running the event, Brian Pluchino, stated “For the Relay For Life program it raises over one-hundred million dollars annually. That money goes towards providing coverage for cancer patients who can’t get to and from their treatments. That gives approximately one-hundred-sixty thousand rides to and from their cancer treatments. They also have a hope lodge, that cancer patients can stay at for free during their treatments through the American Cancer Society. A lot of what these events do, across 20 countries world-wide, is to provide cancer patients with a help line where they can call and talk to someone if they don’t have someone to talk to.”
Lastly stockton’s Relay For Life had a light vigil during the event, each bag was decorated by those who came to the event and represented someone who was affected by cancer. They turned the lights of Big Blue off, allowing the bags to shine. From the floor, event-goers could see the word “HERO” spelled out in the stands. It was truly humbling to see so many bags placed around the track, and that word on the stands resonated with everyone who saw it. Brian Pluchino explained how Stockton got involved in doing Relay For Life, He said that “Someone brought it up while I was a staff member, and approached the Dean Of Students and the Dean Of Students asked if they could bring Relay to Stockton. So we looked into it and gave it a go, and the first year was a staff committee. After the first year we got more and more students involved, since then its been a complete student committee.” It is amazing to see Stockton University’s Relay For Life be a student driven committee. Hopefully, as long as cancer is still a major issue, there will always be events like this to show that there is hope.


Holocaust Remembrance Day; Stockton’s Voice is Heard


By: Kate Rowland 

Sundown on April 11th, for many marked the beginning of Yom HaShoah, universally known as Holocaust Remembrance Day. This service is meant to commemorate the 6 million Jewish victims of the Holocaust, represented by the 6 candles that burn through the ceremony, and give a voice to those that have no one to speak for them. Stockton’s Sara and Sam Schoffer Holocaust Resource Center sponsored a Yom HaShoah service that Tuesday at Congregation Beth Israel, located in Northfield, which was titled “Unto Every Person There Is A Name.” 

To Gail Rosenthal, director of the Sara and Sam Schoffer Holocaust Resource Center at Stockton University, “Yom HaShoah is the remembrance of the Holocaust, which is a prime example of prejudice taken to the extreme. Cause it’s not just one person that brought about the violence and destruction . . . It was neighbor against neighbor.” Stockton electives who were in attendance during the Yom HaShoah ceremony were students Michael Salza, Morgan Vukicevich, Brooke Sovern, David Vaknin, and Stockton President Dr. Harvey Kesselman. Each presenter recited works that commemorated both the deceased and survivors, overall representing Stockton University honorably.


To bring the topic more close to home, Stockton University also provided on campus services as well to honor the 6 million lives lost. Representatives from the two sponsors of the event, Alpha Epsilon Pi Fraternity, Delta Zeta Sorority, students, faculty, and staff read the names of the Jewish victims of the Holocaust that were recorded with Yad Vashem - The World Holocaust Remembrance Center in Jerusalem. 

This event was not only special in that it payed tribute to the millions who died without a voice, but also in showcasing the power of student influence and government. Gail Rosenthal comments, “This was not my idea, I wish I could say, but it wasn’t my idea. It was student initiative and student leadership, so that’s an important way to get activities started.” To see localized activism take this form through Stockton student planning, and to see the turn out of volunteer’s to read the names of those Jewish victims, goes to show that Holocaust Remembrance Day has a reach that goes beyond what is often expected. These services are not just for those in the Jewish community, but for anyone who feels the desire to take a stand for all communities. With that said, make it a must to mark those calendars for next year, and get involved in local services, because there is something for everyone to learn through Yom HaShoah.

Stockton’s Lake Pam Has Criminally Underutilized Trails

by Dominick Tarangelo

Stockton University is built on a 1600-acre plot on land in the middle of the Pinelands National Reserve, in Galloway Township, New Jersey. 

Stockton has many miles of trails located throughout the campus. Recently, one reporter went walking with a couple friends on the trials on the west side of campus. Most students know of the trails around Lake Fred, but do they know about the ones to Lake Pam? 

Located to the east of Vera King Farris Drive, Lake Pam is right next to the New Jersey Parkway Southbound lanes. Stockton University keeps the trials in immaculate condition. When the reporter recently went to visit, it was only a couple days after the Nor'easter hit, and there were broken branches all around the campus. When they later went to visit the Lake, there were no branches blocking in sight. 

However, if you are looking for a map of the trails, it is near impossible. There is no new map on the website that this reporter could find. The best map to be found is from 2011, and only has the trails outlined on the east side of campus leading to Lake Pam. As this reporter was walking the trails, they ran into a fellow student and asked him if he knew where they could get a map of the trails; all he said was “If you find one let me know,” and continued on his run. 

Despite those downsides, the one outstanding part about these trails are the signage. There are signs on all the trails, letting you know what path you’re taking, and also what wildlife you could possibly see on that specific trail. 

Hopefully, once the weather gets warmer, the university will advertise the trails, and anyone can go for walk around the campus and explore new places. Since we are located in a National Reserve please be aware for wildlife and pick up any trash that you see to keep the trails to keep Lake Pam staying beautiful.

Monday, April 23, 2018

Stockton 1st Annual Lavender Graduation





For the first time on May 7th, Stockton University will be joining over 160 universities in hosting the Lavender Pinning Ceremony. Laurie Dutton, Director of the Women’s Gender and Sexuality Center and member of the Lavender Graduation Committee, detailed what the event is, “The Lavender Pinning Ceremony is based on the Human Rights Campaign, Lavender Graduation that is done by a number of schools. It is an annual ceremony conducted on numerous campuses to honor gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, and ally students, and to acknowledge their contribution to the university.”


While this is a first at Stockton, the origins of this ceremony dates back to 1995. The first Lavender Graduation Ceremony was pioneered by Dr. Ronni Sanlo, a Jewish Lesbian. She was denied the ability to attend the graduations of her own biological children, because of her sexual orientation. Dutton added, “It was from that experience that she came to understand the pain felt by her students”. This, plus encouragement from the Dean of Students at the University of Michigan, lead to Dr. Sanlo creating the first Ceremony, involving three graduates at the University of Michigan. “The reason why it is lavender is that it is a combination of blue and pink, so the middle ground is lavender” Dutton detailed. Lavender has always been a significant color to LGBTQ history, dating back to Nazi Germany, where gay men were forced to wear pink triangles in concentration camps, and lesbians had to wear black triangles as political prisoners.


When asked about the significance of bringing the event to Stockton, Dutton detailed the impact she hopes this will make. “I think it’s needed, I don’t think we do enough to acknowledge the LGBT students here on campus” Dutton commented, adding “we can always do more”. Last year, Stockton answered a survey called the Campus Pride Index, receiving a 3.5 out of 5 stars on it. Discussing the score and results, Dutton went on to say, “First time around, it’s not too bad, and it answers how we take care of LGBT students regarding residential life and the missions, wellness, and counseling. When we received the feedback one of the things we saw we can make better is in the field of academics and recognizing our LGBT students.” To participate in this ceremony, you only have to be LGBT or an ally. “It’s really just a way to honor and acknowledge our LGBT students and allies” Dutton stated, going on to describe the reasoning of the pin. “The reason why we choose a pin instead of a lavender cord is for a couple of reasons, one being that the cord falls more under like an academic type program, and that not what this is. This is really something under Academic Affairs. The pin, you can come back to Stockton events and where it proudly.” Dutton has high hopes for this ceremony saying, “What we hope to get back is that our LGBT graduates feel like ‘hey, Stockton was an amazing place’ and that they want to give back to Stockton in different ways that can impact the LGBT community here on campus and the WGSC.” Furthermore adding, “We hope to eventually have an LGBT alumni conference that everybody can return to.”





Currently, there are 11 graduates signed up to participate in the first annual Lavender Pinning Ceremony. They are still accepting and encouraging Stockton LGBTQIA+ alumni new and old to participate and be recognized. A link to the application form can be found on The Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Center at Stockton University Facebook page.





Stockton's “Fast Food” Philosophy Leaves Students Starving

By Michael Donne

Eating healthy is never an easy time for anyone. Money, time, and availability are hurdles healthy eaters. Unfortunately, being at Stockton University, especially as a freshmen makes this infuriatingly difficult. With a lack of a kitchen in living space, what Stockton serves is what you get, junk food galore, and healthy items few and far between. However, when a person's diet is limited, whether by health conditions, choice, or religion, choices become even more scarce.

Kelly Amendola, a freshman vegetarian living on campus, a group Stockton struggles to support. For Kelly, the only practical place to get food would be N-Wing, as the food court vegetarian options are scarce. Kelly says some improvements Stockton can make on better food options, “There should be more options in the actual food court rather than just N-wing.” With N-wing not having the best hours, it can be difficult for students to work their schedule around, because only one option is suited for their lifestyle. While these are only inconveniences, people with health conditions have a much rougher time finding food appropriate to eat.

Nicole Mofrad is a freshmen resident at Stockton that has abnormal enzymes in her liver. While normal levels of enzymes in twelve to thirty-two, Nicole has 266. It is unaware what the exact problem is, but the problem only recently came up in December. The only way for Nicole to combat this is working out and healthy eating. However, Stockton's healthy options aren’t good enough, and Nicole puts Stockton's philosophy of serving on why. Nicole Mofrad says, “They don’t put a lot of effort into making it healthy for you,they just wanna feed you and that’s it. Because that's their requirement, they just have to feed you.” Stockto'ns “give and go” mindset sacrifices much of the food quality, leaving much of the meat to appear as if it was heavily processed. The lack of fresh food is one of the biggest problems Nicole has with the food, and putting more money towards fresh food could solve many of the issues. Nicole talks about N-wings produce and says, “You can tell that a lot of the produce that they have there is one, frozen, and two, they leave it out for like a week at a time, its gross.

With Passover underway, the support Stockton has given has been minuscule. The only noticeable change was matzo ball soup being served for one day. Stockton has put the responsibility up to clubs as one of the only places to reliably find food to eat. Brandon Bess, a freshmen resident, discusses the routine he has had to follow to participate, “I’ve mostly been eating in my dorm . . . There’s been nothing special for Passover. While eating right can be an inconvenience for most people, it is a lot harder for other individuals who follow a strict diet. This groups lack of size has left them underrepresented by the University, and a change must be made to cater to all groups.

SSTV: An Underrated Club that Offers a lot for Students



By Luke Miller


At Stockton University, there are many great clubs and organizations to join. There is a variety for any and all majors. One club, in particular, that offers a lot to people, whether if they are a Communication Major or not, is Stockton Student TV. They are a club made to create programming for Stockton Students covering news about the school or events ran by the school. Students are also able to work on their own personal projects. They allow students to rent equipment to work on those projects, as well. This club is a great opportunity for students to learn more about film and TV production.

After speaking with Jackson Boisvert, a freshman at Stockton and member of SSTV, he stated, “ I joined SSTV because I’m interested in doing something TV related when I’m older and I enjoy doing on camera productions. Plus I really wanted to get involved with something communications related as a freshman.” Jackson spoke about a project him and fellow classmate, Colton Van Cleave, started in the Fall 2017 semester, called “The Nest”, which is a weekly news show in which Jackson and Colton cover Stockton events. This project was their idea as well, which SSTV helped execute by providing equipment and support. Jackson also said “If you’re interested in getting involved with the communication program here at Stockton, or you’re interested in film or camera work or even editing, you can find something to do in SSTV.”

Jackson is a great example of finding this opportunity, and now he has began his resume building thanks to SSTV. The club offers a lot to students and if interested in joining, check out their studio on the second floor of the campus center! This club would be great for any student at Stockton, and it is never too late to get involved.


Stockton Off-Campus Shuttle Service


By: Zahirah Pearsall



Stockton's shuttle services are a hot topic for debate among students, staff, and faculty. Hours could be spent arguing about the slowness or the reliability of the shuttles or how they never show up at the times listed on the shuttle service phone app. However, a bigger issue is being missed in this ongoing discussion; should Stockton offer an off-campus shuttle service?

With Stockton opening the doors to the new Atlantic City Campus, the university is offering students transportation to and from the Galloway location to the shore location, but why has there been no shuttle service to other off site locations? Surely, with other beautiful and renovated locations such as Manahawkin and Hammonton, a bus schedule to accommodate students living on campus can be arranged? Many students would like to take advantage of the classes offered offsite without having to worry about forking out a ton of money on gas to get to and from the locations.

Another Off-Campus Service location could be popular places such as Shoprite or the Hamilton Mall. While Stockton does offer several locations where students can go and get hot meals or stock up on non-perishables for the times when everything is closed. Nothing will beat a trip to a full sized super market. "I have my car on campus, but it would still be nice to have the option of not having to use it," Matthew Treadwell, a student, stated, "I'm a typical broke college student, so saving money where I can is always nice."

It is no secret that Stockton is trying its absolute hardest to bring in more students while at the same time retaining the ones that it has. However, fancy new buildings and beach front locations should not be the only way of thinking when it comes to appeasing the current and future students. Having more transportation options is a start on the road to a happier Stockton community.

Galloway Girl Takes On Idol

Galloway Local Makes It On American Idol


By Amanda Genovese


Mara Justine, a 16-year-old Galloway Township resident and High School Sophomore at Absegami High School, first auditioned for American Idol back in October. Her audition aired on national Television this Spring. She made it through Hollywood rounds which is one of the most challenging times for every contestant, then made it to top fifty and battled through the solo rounds. On Monday night, it was final judgement in which the whole world and township of Galloway was going to find out if Mara made it to Top 24, the most suspenseful moment anyone can go through. Her powerful voice has made it thus far in the competition, during solo roundsshe got a standing ovation from the judges. As final judgement approached, the Galloway teenager was awaiting to see if she made it to Top 24, as did the whole Galloway Township community. Was her standing ovation from the judges enough for her to gain a spot in the Top 24?
Mara Justine was just a typical jersey girl that did her homework and enjoyed being down the shore with her family. It was in the hands of the judges to decide on her fate of becoming a star from being just a small town girl. Sure enough, our own Galloway girl made it to the top 24 in which assures her a spot on the Idol Tour.  “It would be pretty cool to see Mara go far in the competition and represent our community, if she makes it to the finals she can come back to hometowns and visit our college and that would be pretty cool.” Stockton freshman, Alaina Rush said. For being so young, her voice is very powerful and talented enough to take her to the finals.  “Seeing a young girl with such an amazing voice make it to Top 24 for sure makes me feel proud to be a part of this community, she represents us well.” Stockton freshman, Alaina Rush stated. Follow Mara Justine’s journey on ABC on Sunday nights and Monday nights.

Stockton University Hosts First Lavender Graduation Celebration




By Jackson Boisvert
For the first time on May 7th, Stockton University will be joining over 160 universities across the country in hosting a Lavender Pinning Ceremony. Laurie Dutton, Director of the Stockton University Women’s Gender and Sexuality Center and member of the Lavender Graduation Committee, detailed what the event is: “The Lavender Pinning Ceremony is based on the Human Rights Campaign, or Lavender Graduation that is done by a number of schools. It is an annual ceremony conducted on numerous campuses to honor gay, lesbian, bisexual, transgender, queer, and ally students, and to acknowledge their contribution to the university.”

While this is a first at Stockton, the origins of this ceremony dates back to 1995. The first Lavender Graduation Ceremony was pioneered by Dr. Ronni Sanlo, a Jewish Lesbian. She was denied the ability to attend the graduations of her own biological children, because of her sexual orientation. Dutton added, “It was from that experience that she came to understand the pain felt by her students.” This experience, in addition to encouragement from the Dean of Students at the University of Michigan, lead Dr. Sanlo creating the first Lavender Pinning Ceremony, involving three graduates at the University of Michigan. “The reason why it is lavender is that it is a combination of blue and pink, so the middle ground is lavender,” Dutton stated. Lavender has always been a significant color to LGBTQ history, dating back to Nazi Germany, when gay men were forced to wear pink and lavender triangles in concentration camps, and lesbians wore black triangles as political prisoners.

When asked about the significance of bringing the event to Stockton, Dutton stated the impact she hopes it will make. “I think it’s needed, and I don’t think we do enough to acknowledge the LGBT students here on campus,” she said, adding “we can always do more.”

Last year, Stockton students, faculty and staff answered a survey called the Campus Pride Index, receiving a 3.5 out of 5 stars on it. Dutton said, “For the first time around, it’s not too bad, and it answers how we take care of LGBT students regarding residential life and the missions, wellness, and counseling. When we received the feedback, one of the things we saw we can make better is in the field of academics and recognizing our LGBT students.”

To participate in this ceremony, a student need only be LGBT or an ally. “It’s really just a way to honor and acknowledge our LGBT students and allies,” Dutton stated. “The reason why we choose a pin instead of a lavender cord is for a couple of reasons, one being that the cord falls more under like an academic type program, and that not what this is. This is really something under Student Affairs. The pin, you can come back to Stockton events and where it proudly.” Dutton has high hopes for this ceremony saying, “What we hope to get back is that our LGBT graduates feel like ‘hey, Stockton was an amazing place’ and that they want to give back to Stockton in different ways that can impact the LGBT community here on campus and the WGSC.” She added, “We hope to eventually have an LGBT alumni conference that everybody can return to.”

Currently, there are 11 graduates signed up to participate in the first annual Lavender Pinning Ceremony. They are still accepting and encouraging Stockton LGBTQIA+ alumni new and old to participate and be recognized. A link to the application form can be found on The Women’s, Gender & Sexuality Center at Stockton University Facebook page.

Stockton’s Mu Sigma Upsilon Sorority Hosts Tea for Two

Written by: Jake Levitz

 Tuesday, April 10th at 8pm, Stockton University's chapter of Mu Sigma Upsilon hosted its first ever tea party. This event was part of their community communication initiative in order to host a free event that the whole school could attend. They call it Tea for 2, an opportunity for students to connect and get to know a stranger and create new friends and bonds with their fellow students.

The president of the chapter, Kelly Sounthavong, said the event was “something for the school and not just the sorority… a way for us to mingle and get to know everybody,” the sisters of Mu Sigma Upsilon wanted to create an more intimate opportunity for dialogue between them and their fellow students. President Sounthavong was encouraging about the influence this event might have on other greek organizations, she hopes that it will create a platform for groups to get together and share a dialogue to possibly create more free events that are not just mandatory, so that people can get together and just simply talk.

Being a smaller sorority, the sisters of Mu Sigma Upsilon wanted to engage with the Stockton community Mu Sigma Upsilon encourages all students and members of the community to participate in their relationship building event. Tea for 2 is described by the sorority as “an opportunity to engage with students from all areas of the schools campus life,” describing it as, “speed dating but for friendship.” The sisters of the sorority always enjoy being able to participate within the community especially in the Stockton community which is an opportunity to build with their sisters as a whole in a team building experience. Being a smaller sorority creates an introverted environment so by participating in events such as this helps.

President Sounthavong says, “Expand on greek unity together and expand on our other connections besides greek life.” By coming to the sorority, Southavong says, “ I just met this stranger, but I feel safe with them. I just spilled some of my secrets with them but I’m ok with that. I'm in a safe space right now to be myself.” The sisters of Mu Sigma Upsilon hope to participate in more Stockton community based events in order to further engage relationship building development. Other events planned for the sorority include educational based events and many future philanthropic planned functions. The sisters hope to promote more free thinking functions in the future.

Pancakes for a Purpose




This past Sunday, the Delta Delta Delta sorority of Stockton University hosted their annual TriHop Pancake Breakfast. This event was held on campus at the Lakeside Lodge. The event was open for anyone to attend and was a great time to spend with family, friends, and fellow Stockton students.


Demi DeAngelis, a sister of Delta Delta Delta and their Philanthropy Chair, who organized the event, described the event in her own words: “TriHop is a fundraiser that Tri Delta hosts once a year! It’s basically a buffet-style pancake breakfast. Our sisters provide the food and they make it fresh while we’re there!”


All week prior to TriHop, the sisters of the sorority were tabling to spread the word about the event. From the money that was collected at tabling, to the money collected at the event, the event gathered a grand total of approximately $2,000. All of the proceeds go to Tri Delta’s national philanthropy, St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital.


The sorority also held a raffle for the chance to win different themed baskets filled with different items. There were also fun activities that also help the philanthropy with a ‘Pie a Delta’ in the face for $1!




Demi then shared her thoughts on the event and why she personally enjoys it: “I really like this event because everyone’s families and friends come! We’re so passionate about fundraising for St. Jude, and I love that we get to show our family and friends how much it means to us and all of our accomplishments. It’s really nice spending the day with everyone, raising money for a great cause and eating lots of food!”





Stockton Selling Seaview




Stockton University has just announced that one of their campuses, Seaview resort, will no longer be in their position by the end of this decade after nearly ten years of being part of Stockton’s residence. According to Stockton University’s President, Harvey Kesselman, the reason they are selling this resort is due to a combination of the opening of the new campus in Atlantic City and the constantly high expense of maintaining Seaview. As a result, it was solely in the best interest of Stockton’s management that Seaview be sold to ease the financial stress of the university. Thus, the new beachfront housing for 533 students at the new Atlantic City campus will serve as its spiritual replacement.


Now President Harvey Kesselman has stated that the name of the potential buyer and the sale price will not be released until the sale is completed. This means that they haven’t found a buyer yet; though it has been speculated that they will find one with in the year due to the high value of the property. Many of the 267 students that are living at Seaview are a bit saddened by this, especially since it’s the students who are having trouble finding residence in Stockton’s standard campuses often go to as a last resort. It is a very enjoyable last resort for them too, with their golf club, fancy rooms that many celebrities have visited, and their peaceful view of the Atlantic City shoreline. Parting will truly be sweet sorrow once the purchase is complete.

 

Stars for a Cause








Stockton University and the sisters of Zeta Tau Alpha sorority hosted their annual Search for the Stars event on Thursday, March 22nd. The sorority has this event every year to help support their national philanthropy, breast cancer education and awareness. During this event, multiple students of Stockton competed in a talent show. The event was held in Stockton’s Performing Arts Center on campus at 8 pm. Anyone was able to participate, making for a great social event being very inclusive. Some competitors included the new member classes of different sororities and fraternities at Stockton performing group dances. Other competitors were single acts from ZTA sisters. There were nine different acts ranging from choreographed dancing, piano and guitar playing, and singing. As the show began to wrap up, ZTA was pulling raffle tickets for baskets that they have put together, while the judges were tallying the contestants scores. After evaluating all of the acts, the winner was announced. Gianna Graw, a graduating sister of Zeta Tau Alpha, came out on top winning with her singing and guitar-playing act. Sarah Girolamo, a freshman and new member of ZTA shared her experience, “being a part of Search for the Stars was an experience that I will never forget. It was the first time, as a new member, that my pledge class got close and came together to put on a performance. It was my first real experience running an event held by ZTA and, while doing so, it made me realize why I joined such an organization.” Being a part of this experience, either in the crowd or actually involved in the show, was a great time to see multiple Stockton Greek organizations come together and put on an entertaining show, all while raising money for a great cause.




Professor Privitello Teaches Students to “Love Wisdom”




A free-spirited professor with long silver hair and a full beard encourages students to “love wisdom” by teaching philosophy courses at Stockton University.


Often wearing Old Gringo boots and designer overcoats is Dr. Lucio Angelo Privitello, Coordinator and Associate Professor of Stockton’s Philosophy and Religion program. He explained the word “philosophy” comes from the Greek roots “philo,” meaning love, and “sophy,” meaning wisdom; making “philosophy,” the “love of wisdom.” He clarified “philosophy” literally translates to the command: “love wisdom.”


This professor was born and raised in Italy, where he received a Superior Diploma in Ceramics and Design from Instituto D’Arte Raffaello Libertini, an art school in Sicily. After moving to the United States, he earned a B.F.A. in Sculpture from the Rhode Island School of Design. Dr. Privitello used his art education to start a contracting company with his brother, called Praxis Installations.


He elaborated, “We were both, trained well, and good with our hands, so we did a great and honest business, until we decided to continue on with what we loved doing even more.” After his first M.A. in Philosophy from Temple University, Dr. Privitello transitioned from “tile, marble, and granite installations,” to teaching as an adjunct professor. Meanwhile, he earned a M.A. and Ph.D. in Philosophy from Villanova University, which eventually led to a full-time tenure track position at Stockton. “Here I am at Stockton University, very happily. I have great colleagues, and the students always come up to bat, and classes are, and have, been a blast,” he stated.


In the Fall 2018 semester, this professor will conflate his art and philosophy knowledge to teach The Philosophies of Art, cross-listed as “ARTV/PHIL 3116,” providing an “Arts” attribute, “. . . that is all about theories of creativity, theories of beauty, and the meaning and making of art,” he described while adding, “Creativity is all we have to overcome the weight of time.”


Likewise, Dr. Privitello will teach Ancient Greek Philosophy, listed as PHIL 2109, providing “Global Studies and Values/Ethics” attributes. This course “tracks the birth of the history of western philosophy,” and discusses several well-known ancient philosophers.


For philosophy gurus is Philosophical Methods, listed as “PHIL 3615,” providing a “W2 Writing Across Curriculum” attribute. This is a required course for all philosophy majors and minors, where students prepare to write a serious paper. He explained, “I enjoy giving students the range to make their choice of what really inspired them in their readings, then along with my help and guidance, they can really shine,” and added, “Each course will be an intense journey.”


If any Osprey is interested in “an intense journey” with philosophical Professor Privitello, they should contact their preceptor, found on Stockton’s Go Portal.

Friday, April 6, 2018

Stockton Food Assistance Implements Campus Food Pantry


by Jocelyn Quinones

As the semester approaches it end, some students come across the most frustrating question of being a college student away from Mom’s home cooked meals. “What am I going to eat?” With limited meal swipes, or excessive usage, students find themselves in difficult situations when their balance reaches zero. In an effort to put an end to campus hunger, Stockton has been implanting new methods to make students comfortable enough to step forward and be resourceful.

This issue was brought to the attention of the Campus Board of Trustees and in doing so, they approved the Food Assistance Program in July of 2015, officially implemented in the Fall 2015 semester. Before the Pantry’s opening, they developed meal vouchers in which students can obtain up to 5 per week. These vouchers gave students free access to the campus N-wing dining. As more students stepped forward, and let officials know N-wing hours conflicted most days with their class schedules, they developed the pantry. This made it so students could also cook at home or in their dorms beyond Stockton hours.

Fortunately, the rules to the pantry are simple. Located in the Dean of Students' Office, students can just go in, sign their Z number, grab a bag, and just start packing. There isn’t a limit to how many items students can take, and it is completely free and anonymous. There’s no set criteria for participation, and no student will be denied access to vouchers or the pantry. Since its opening on February 1st, there have been a total of 110 visits, which averages to 11 visits a week. To date, the pantry has received 2 restock orders from the Community food bank and over 800 items from both the Student Senate, and The Center for Community Engagement food drives. If you ever find yourselves starving on campus, come by and grab some food, because there is plenty of it.

Thursday, April 5, 2018

Stockton’s Community TV Partnership provides unique opportunity for students


By Michael Heilman


It’s that time of year again where students register for Summer and Fall classes at Stockton University. For students who need to take an internship, look no further than the Community TV Internship. This internship gives students a real-world working experience in the television industry. Michael Zubrzycki, the Liaison for TV Studio and Academic Support, who works with the students in the studio says “Through the internship, students gain hands-on experience in television studio production, participating in a number of crew positions from director to camera operator. Students receive broadcast credit, as these programs are not only online, but also aired on through local broadcasting sources. The internship is focused on providing students real-world experience that will enhance and strengthen their resumes.” Students will produce three shows a week, and those shows are Latino Motion with Bert Lopez, 30, The Press of AC television magazine and South Jersey Business with Joe Molineaux.


Students who decide to take this internship will come away with a ton of knowledge and understanding of how the industry works. Zubrzycki explains, “Students gain the advantage of developing their technical, teamwork and interpersonal skills in the studio environment will increase. Interns will also be exposed to the production processes within the studio that demand teamwork and group cooperation in order to succeed. Students will also develop professional interpersonal skills by utilizing their skill sets successfully with program clients and guests.”


Student’s will have the opportunity to network with the talents of Latino Motion’s Bert Lopez, South Jersey Business Joe Molineaux, and Pamela Dollak, Maxwell Reil along with other staff members from the Press of Atlantic City. Zubrzycki adds that “Interns are exposed to a variety of professionals through this internship, including local politicians, business owners, non-profit organizations and community organizers. Students have a unique opportunity to form professional one-on-one connections, and such networking may lead to valuable references, recommendations, interviews and employment offers.”

Students who are interested in the internship are encouraged to contact Professor Ludovich and Professor Newman by email, phone or visit their office. The internship is offered every semester.

Monday, April 2, 2018

Stockton Student TV to Host Masquerade Ball

By: Luke Miller & Colton Van Cleave

On Friday April 6th at 8pm, Stockton Student Television will host Stockton University's first ever Masquerade Ball at the Lakeside Lodge. The event costs $7 a ticket for basic admission to the dance or $10 for a ticket plus a masquerade mask. The event's intent is to raise money for Make A Wish NJ in hopes of making a child's wish come to life! The event organizers have made it a goal to raise a total of $1,000 for Make A Wish NJ, and it's a goal the organizers themselve believe to be obtainable. Along with the main goal hoping to be accomplished by hosting the dance, they hope to provide a special night for students, one that has not been seen at Stockton University before! This formal styled dance will entail everything from night-life entertainment, provided by Sigma Alpha Epsilon’s Zach Muntazar, as DJ. The event organizers are Nadira Anderson, Jessica Burton, Colton Van Cleave, and Mikayla Yuen. Also assisting in hosting and organizing are volunteers from SAE Fraternity, and media coverage from the event host, SSTV, and their reporters and personnel. 

After sitting down with Colton Van Cleave, member of SSTV and one of the event's organizers, we learned more about how the event started as an idea, and came to fruition. "We got the idea from our friend Brittany Valenti who helped us out at the beginning stages of setting the event up. Considering the idea of Make A Wish NJ, it got me thinking as to how the dance would make a real positive impact for a child out there. An event like this will also boost Stockton University by showing that we are here to make real positive changes in the community around us, and while doing that, improving on campus entertainment life on a Friday night." Colton went on to explain, he was inspired by Tim Tebow who has held similar events in the past, but for different charities. Colton and Tim both chose the dance style format to raise awareness and funds for their respective charities. Colton explained why it's important for Stockton students, "By them coming out to an event like this, they are taking the first step in making a positive impact on child's life. Too often, we are engulfed by everyday rhetoric where we often forget who we are as people, and it starts with a community, and student body uniting like this to create real change."

Make sure to come out and support SSTV and the Make A Wish NJ on April 6th at 8 pm, at the Lakeside Lodge. It is sure to be a great event, with a great cause attached to it.

Sunday, April 1, 2018

Stockton prepares to launch first Thrift Store

By Timothy L. Shanahan

In the Lakeside residential area, parallel to D-court lies shed 31, Stockton Universities’ first trading post. The grand opening to residential students will take place on March 29th at 9am – 1pm. The Trading Post will be selling a variety of goods that will assist students on campus, namely tools, clothes, and even various camping equipment for the students that can’t afford such materials. The cost of these items will be very affordable for college students and prices are said to compare to those of a thrift store. Students can also bring their old clothes and exchange them for clothes in the post. This new store is run by a Katlin Clark, Who started to set up this store with her staff on January of this year for the purpose of reducing waste on campus as well as recycle unused tools and clothes that get unused and left behind in campus dorms when students leave, and use them to help new students that have a rough time adjusting to the costly needs of college.

The staff consists of Katlin Clark as the store manager, as well as her three staff members Richard Feather, Anthony Featherman, and Sidney Hunter. All of which are taking turns to clean up, inventory management, and register. There is plenty of room for this staff to grow as the donations grow more and more each day. They are currently accepting donations in hopes of expanding their inventory. Since establishing The Trading Post, they have been receiving stacks of donated clothes and would appreciate it if other items were donated as well with the goal of having various college necessities at a low cost. So grab all of your unwanted items and line up on March 29th, remember, another man's trash is another man's treasure.